MSW and PhD Collaborative Specializations

Open to MSW and PhD students: Collaborative Graduate Specialization in…

Open to MSW students only: Collaborative Graduate Specialization in…

Open to PhD students only: Collaborative Graduate Specialization in…

 

Collaborative Graduate Specialization in Addiction Studies

For a detailed listing of MSW & PhD Requirements please go to the CoSAS Web Site.

Note: Students must apply and be accepted into the MSW Program before applying to the CoSAS Specialization. You can apply to CoSAS at any time following notice of your acceptance to the MSW program CoSAS application form.  Both MSW and PhD students are required to take PAS 3700H Multidisciplinary Aspects of Addiction.

The goal of the Collaborative Specialization in Addiction Studies (CoSAS) at the University of Toronto is to develop and integrate graduate training in the multidisciplinary field of addictions. This field encompasses the use and abuse of alcohol, tobacco and other psychoactive substances, as well as gambling and other addictive behaviours.

Students fulfilling the requirements of the collaborating department and CoSAS will receive a notation indicating completion of a specialization in Addiction Studies on the transcript issued by the University of Toronto.

 

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Collaborative Graduate Specialization in Aging, Palliative and Supportive Care Across the Life Course

For a detailed listing of MSW & PhD Requirements please go to the Web site.

Note: Both MSW and PhD students are required to take AGE3000H Advanced Research Seminar in Aging and the Life Course (AGE2000H is a prerequisite for entry into the doctoral level of the Collaborative Specialization)

The Collaborative Specialization in Aging, Palliative and Supportive Care Across the Life Course prepares students for specialization in the field of aging and/or the field of palliative and supportive care, with an emphasis on viewing aging issues within the perspective of the life course. The Collaborative Specialization offers students two options of study:

  1. Aging and the life course
  2. Palliative and supportive care

Students must apply to and register in a home participating unit (i.e., one of the graduate programs listed above), and follow a course of study acceptable to both the graduate unit and the Collaborative Specialization in Aging, Palliative and Supportive Care Across the Life Course.

Upon successful completion of the requirements, students receive, in addition to the master’s degree from the home graduate unit, the notation on their transcript: “Completed the Collaborative Specialization in Aging, Palliative and Supportive Care Across the Life Course”.

 

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Collaborative Graduate Specialization in Asia-Pacific Studies

Open to MSW students only.

For a detailed listing of MSW Requirements please go to the Web site.

The graduate programs listed above participate in the collaborative master’s degree program in Asia-Pacific Studies at the University of Toronto. The collaborating units contribute courses and provide facilities and supervision for master’s level research. This specialization is administered by a Program Committee chaired by a Program Director.

The collaborative master’s degree specialization in Asia-Pacific Studies is designed to provide graduates with advanced training in a particular discipline and in the historical and social science studies of modern East and Southeast Asia. The major topics of emphasis are political economy, modern and contemporary social history, international relations, gender, political and social change, economic development, and cultural studies. The specialization contributes to the development of an integrated and interdisciplinary research community in Asia-Pacific Studies at the University.

Applicants are expected to meet the admission and degree requirements of both a home unit and the specialization in Asia-Pacific Studies. The collaborative master’s degree specialization requirements can be met concurrently with, or in addition to, home unit requirements. Students who successfully complete the requirements of the collaborative specialization will receive the notation “Completed Collaborative Specialization in Asia-Pacific Studies” on their transcript in addition to the master’s degree from the home unit.

 

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Collaborative Graduate Specialization in Bioethics

Open to PhD students only.

For a detailed listing of PhD Requirements please go to the Web site.

Introduced in 1994, the Collaborative Specialization in Bioethics (CSB), a research-stream graduate program, has admitted more than 50 students. The seven graduate units of Health Policy, Management and Evaluation (HPME), Law (LAW), Medical Science (IMS), Nursing (NUR), Philosophy (PHL), Public Health Sciences (PHS), and Religion (RLG) collaborate to offer master’s (LLM, MA, MHSc, MN, MSc) and doctoral (PhD, SJD) degrees.

The CSB prepares students who will specialize in bioethics with an emphasis on innovative interdisciplinary research and scholarship in bioethics, and trains scholars whose primary goal is to contribute original research in bioethics. Students are expected to conduct innovative research in relation to the discipline of their home departments and to have a working knowledge of selected bioethical issues from the current viewpoint of each of the other relevant disciplines.

 

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Collaborative Graduate Specialization in Community Development

Open to MSW students only.

For a detailed listing of MSW Requirements please go to the Web site.

The Collaborative Specialization provides students with a multidisciplinary graduate education in community development. Community development involves working with community members and groups to effect positive change in the social, economic, organizational, or physical structures of a community that improve both the welfare of community members and the community’s ability to direct its future.

Students must apply to and register in a home participating unit (i.e., one of the graduate departments or faculties listed above), and follow a course of study acceptable to both that unit and the Collaborative Specialization in Community Development. Applications are considered for the master’s degree programs listed above.

 

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Collaborative Graduate Specialization in Ethnic and Pluralism Studies

For a detailed listing of MSW & PhD Requirements please go to the Web site.

Note:  PhD students must take the Interdisciplinary Seminar: JTH3000H Coordinating Seminar in Ethnic and Pluralism Studies. Students who have already taken this course for the master’s degree need not repeat it.

Our specialization aims to serve as a focal point for the study of ethnic and race relations across a range of disciplines and professional fields at the University of Toronto. The university has a wealth of resources related to such issues as: indigenous peoples, immigration, nationalism, cultural and linguistic groups, ethnic communities, and inter-group attitudes and relations. Each of these has impacts across a range of institutions – in employment and the economy, education, health and social services, local communities, politics and government, and in regional and international relations. The result is a comprehensive pool of specialized knowledge and experience doing justice to the complexities involved in considering the “Canadian mosaic,” parallel issues in other countries, and across the globe. An understanding of these issues in the making of policy, and the possibilities for the application of future research are exciting.

 

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Collaborative Graduate Specialization In Health Services and Policy Research

For a detailed listing of PhD Requirements please go to the Web site.

The overall goal of the specialization is to increase health research capacity in Ontario through an innovative training program that builds on existing strengths in university and decision making environments.

Partnering with a number of health care organizations, the Collaborative Specialization in Health Services and Policy Research offers graduate training leading to a Diploma in Health Services and Policy Research.

Specific objectives of the specialization include:

  • to provide training in health services research for graduate students,
  • to enhance the quality and breadth of trans-disciplinary training in health services research, and
  • to include decision makers as active partners in teaching, program and curriculum planning, and the provision of field placements for students.

This competency-based specialization focuses on the following five areas:

  1. understanding the Canadian health care system,
  2. ability to carry out health services research,
  3. understanding theories regarding how the health of populations is produced,
  4. understanding theories of health and health services knowledge production, and
  5. knowledge exchange and development of research partnerships.

 

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Collaborative Specialization in Public Health Policy

Coordinator: Carmen Logie
Website

This Collaborative Specialization provides students with exemplary training in public health policy, which fosters synergies and cross-disciplinary learning. It gives students the capacity to engage in current events and contribute to the development, refinement, and evaluation of policies to address society’s pressing and emerging public health priorities. The collaborative specialization is cross-disciplinary, bringing together a broad range of disciplines, substantive foci, and theoretical and methodological underpinnings, to synergistically build an engaged community of practice of students and faculty focused on public health policy. It contributes to the creation of the next generation of public health policy research leaders and creative agents for change, able to address current health issues and challenges. Through the direction of the stellar team of academics and policy-makers associated with the collaborative specialization, students are provided with real-world skills to address the complex and demanding task of public health policy-making (including insight into a wide array of legislative and regulatory interventions, administrative practices, financing and funding decisions, and various forms of soft law, such as guidelines and informal processes) which operate at the international, federal, provincial, and municipal levels in ways that are both cross-jurisdictional and cross-sectoral.

 

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Collaborative PhD Specialization in Human Development

Note: Students must first complete the core course HDV1000H, a fall half-course in Pluralistic Human Development

Adverse exposures early in a child’s life can “get under the skin” to affect life-long health, learning and social functioning. These developmental trajectories involve complex interplay between genes and the environment.

The long-term success of our children and society, socially and economically, will depend on our ability to disentangle the dynamic relationship between genes and environment in the context of human development, as well as our ability to successfully implement this knowledge to benefit children.

The CSHD offers PhD students in any year a unique opportunity to engage with these issues in an integrative, transdiciplinary setting.

Course Objective:

  • Inspire and facilitate collaborative research in the broad area of early human development
  • Encourage and cultivate the ability to work across disciplinary boundaries
  • Develop the necessary skills to convey scientific knowledge to a non-academic audience

 

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Collaborative Graduate Specialization in Sexual Diversity Studies

For a detailed listing of MSW & PhD Requirements please go to the Web site.

The Collaborative Specialization in Sexual Diversity Studies, offered by the Mark S. Bonham Centre for Sexual Diversity Studies, is a rigorously interdisciplinary program recognizing sexual diversity studies as an interdisciplinary field of inquiry. While it has emerged as an autonomous scholarly area, many of those who work within it engage questions of gender, ethnicity, race, Aboriginal status, (dis)ability, and class, to highlight the importance of exploring their interaction with sexual differences.

The graduate degree programs listed above participate in the Collaborative Specialization. From their home departments, students may take up questions from their own disciplinary or programmatic perspective, but explore it through the theoretical and methodological lens of sexuality studies.

 

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Collaborative Graduate Specialization in Women and Gender Studies

  • Contact the Collaborative Specialization Office 416-978-3668 for application procedures.
  • Website

For a detailed listing of MSW & PhD Requirements please go to the Website.

Specialization Requirements:
Students must demonstrate familiarity with the approaches and methodologies associated with scholarship in women’s studies. If students lack the interdisciplinary background in this field, they should be able to demonstrate extensive familiarity with women’s studies scholarship in a single discipline or a cognate set of disciplines.

The Graduate Collaborative Specialization in Women and Gender Studies (CWGS) provides a formal educational context for the pursuit of interdisciplinary research in women and gender studies and advanced feminist scholarship. The specialization, offered at the master’s and doctoral levels, provides a central coordinating structure to facilitate and disseminate research in women and gender studies through student and faculty research seminars, colloquia, circulation of work in progress, study groups, conferences, and publications. The CWGS contributes to the development of an integrated research community in women and gender studies at the University of Toronto.

The graduate programs listed above participate in the Collaborative Specialization in Women and Gender Studies at the University of Toronto. The collaborating units contribute courses and provide facilities and supervision for graduate research. The specialization is administered by the Women and Gender Studies Institute (WGSI). The CWGS brings together 33 graduate programs providing more than 100 courses and involving over 100 graduate faculty members.

Students who successfully complete the requirements of the collaborative specialization will receive the notation “Completed Collaborative Specialization in Women and Gender Studies” on their transcript, in addition to the master’s or doctoral degree from their home graduate unit.

 

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Collaborative Graduate Specialization in Women’s Health

For a detailed listing of MSW & PhD Requirements please go to the Web site.

The Collaborative Specialization in Women’s Health provides interdisciplinary training in women’s health research and practice for graduate students at the University of Toronto with the goal of:

  • Helping students develop shared understandings of the complex interactions of biology and environment, sex and gender;
  • Providing students with the necessary skill set to undertake and lead interdisciplinary, collaborative health care research projects;
  • Enhancing mutually beneficial relationships among researchers and practitioners of women’s health across the university and its affiliated teaching hospitals.

To successfully complete the Collaborative Specialization in Women’s Health, students must also successfully complete the program requirements of their home graduate unit. Master’s students who successfully complete the specialization will have the following notation added to their transcripts: ‘Completed the Collaborative Specialization in Women’s Health.’